It’s Time for Healthcare Organizations to Take Ownership of Burnout

A June survey from the American Society of Hospital Pharmacists found 74% of U.S. adults are concerned about burnout among healthcare professionals, including nearly one in four (23%) who are very concerned. Eighty percent of Americans reported that when their doctor, pharmacist, nurse, or other healthcare professional is feeling burned out, the quality of their care decreases.

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Report: Antibiotic Resistance More Prevalent in Device-Associated Infections

The report compiled data from more than 5,600 facilities from 2015 to 2017 and found that resistance was consistently higher for device-associated healthcare-acquired infections than for the same bacteria identified after surgical procedures. The devices studied were those used for a limited time in a hospital setting such as central lines, ventilators, and urinary catheters.

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Q&A: The Impact of To Err is Human at 20

Since the report’s initial claim that as many as 98,000 people die annually from medical errors, there have been major strides in changing healthcare organization’s systemic problem, workplace cultures, and improvement processes.

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Freestanding Emergency Departments Can Increase Patient Spending

The recent study, which was published in the journal Academic Emergency Medicine, examined freestanding emergency department data collected in Arizona, Florida, North Carolina, and Texas from January 2013 to December 2017. The researchers focused on total spending on emergency care, out‐of‐pocket spending, utilization, and price per visit.

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