Judge Orders New Olympus Trial Over Superbug Death

At the initial Bigler trial last year, jurors rejected claims that the design of the company’s top-selling gastrointestinal scope hampered cleaning and declined to award punitive damages to the family. Instead, the jury ordered Olympus to pay the Seattle hospital involved $6.6 million in damages. In turn, the hospital, Virginia Mason Medical Center, had to pay the family $1 million.

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The Tale of The Flying Gurney, and Other Events That Should Never Happen, But Still Do

While hospitals do their best to limit the number of so-called “never events” that happen to their patients, recent events show that there is still work to be done.

In patient safety circles, “never events” are mistakes that should simply never happen—seemingly commonsense mistakes such as a surgeon accidentally leaving a scalpel inside a patient, a newborn infant given to the wrong parents, or any death of a patient due to the gross negligence of a caregiver.

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An Opioid Remedy That Works: Treat Pain And Addiction At The Same Time

In 2016, a record 912 people died from an overdose in Colorado, according to data recently released by the state health department. Of those, 300 people died from an opioid overdose. Opioid use often leads to an addiction to heroin, which claimed another 228 lives last year in the state. Those two causes together now rival the number of deaths from car accidents in the state.

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How Hospitals Are Failing Black Mothers

Researchers have found that women who deliver at these so-called “black-serving” hospitals are more likely to have serious complications — from infections to birth-related embolisms to emergency hysterectomies — than mothers who deliver at institutions that serve fewer black women.

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Why Do Healthcare Workers Report to Work When Sick?

Recent study makes the assertion that illness transmission by healthcare employees represents a grave public health hazard. By John Palmer It’s no secret that that healthcare can be a dirty profession. So why is it that despite the warnings about the dangers of not wearing appropriate protection around hazardous drugs and infectious diseases, workers still … Continued

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