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An IC Check-Up

patient safety webinarPlease register for Strategies to Manage Hospital Acquired Conditions Reporting in an ACA World - An IC Check-Up on Sept 9th, 2014 1:00 PM CDT at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5973501898406116610

With the August 1 Final Rule announcement by CMS, it’s time we had an Infection Control check-up from our IC expert, Brian Foy.

Brian will explain recent changes to Federal rules and its impacts on everyday IC preventionists. Then, the team will outline some of the experienced and expected challenges faced by industry partners and their solutions.

More information on Strategies to Manage Hospital Acquired Conditions Reporting in an ACA World - An IC Check-Up...

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FEATURED WHITE PAPER

Is the Answer to Enhanced Patient Safety Hiding in Plain Sight?
The Transformation of “Incident Reporting

Is the Answer to Enhanced Patient Safety Hiding in Plain Sight? The Transformation of “Incident ReportingWe all have these systems, whether paper or electronic, that are supposed to capture incidents that can lead to and/or have resulted in patient harm. Most of these systems can do this, but many will agree that there is something missing – something important – when it comes to whether or not these systems actually enhance patient safety.

We cannot just track incidents anymore; we need to make this an organization-wide process where we build awareness, which leads to intervention, and results in changes that can be seen and monitored. In this white paper, we discuss the transformation of traditional “incident reporting” into an integrated patient safety management system and offer a path to achieve this transformation.


Click here to download a free PDF.

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An important aspect of any product is how easily someone can use it for its intended purpose, also known as usability. Electronic health records (EHR) that are usable have the potential to improve patient care, which is why the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has outlined formal procedures for evaluating the usability of EHR systems.

An important aspect of any product is how easily someone can use it for its intended purpose, also known as usability. Electronic health records (EHR) that are usable have the potential to improve patient care, which is why the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has outlined formal procedures for evaluating the usability of EHR systems.

The proposed usability protocol encourages a user-centered approach to the development of EHR systems. It provides methods to measure and address critical errors in user performance before those systems are deployed in a medical setting.

“This guidance can be a useful tool for EHR developers to demonstrate that their systems don’t lead to use errors or user errors,” said NIST researcher Matt Quinn. “It will provide a way for developers and evaluators to objectively assess how easy their EHR systems are to learn and operate, while maximizing efficiency.”

The protocol is a three-step process consisting of an analysis of how the application functions, expert review, and validation testing of the user interface to make sure it works as intended.

The protocol includes general steps and guidance for evaluating an EHR user interface from a clinical perspective—does it contain, collect and display the information it needs to—and human factors perspectives—can the user understand it and easily find needed information. The interface is then tested by representative user groups performing realistic tasks.

“We hope this encourages system developers to apply human factors best practices and incorporate user-centered design processes,” said Quinn. “These practices and processes have proven records in industries such as aviation, military systems, transportation, nuclear power, and others where safety is a concern.”

The EHR Usability Evaluation Protocol (EUP), Technical Evaluation, Testing and Validation of the Usability of Electronic Health Records (NIST Interagency Report 7804), is available at www.nist.gov/healthcare/usability/index.cfm. A draft version of the document was released for public comment in September 2011. The current version incorporates feedback received.

From NIST Tech Beat, March 20, 2012

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ABQAURP American Society for Quality American Society for Quality Healthcare Division Consumers Advancing Patient Safety
EMPSF Institute for Safe Medical Practices
           
Medically Induced Trauma Support Services (MITSS) Medication Safety Officers Society NPSF Partnership for Patient Safety Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine