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UPCOMING WEBINAR

An IC Check-Up

patient safety webinarPlease register for Strategies to Manage Hospital Acquired Conditions Reporting in an ACA World - An IC Check-Up on Sept 9th, 2014 1:00 PM CDT at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5973501898406116610

With the August 1 Final Rule announcement by CMS, it’s time we had an Infection Control check-up from our IC expert, Brian Foy.

Brian will explain recent changes to Federal rules and its impacts on everyday IC preventionists. Then, the team will outline some of the experienced and expected challenges faced by industry partners and their solutions.

More information on Strategies to Manage Hospital Acquired Conditions Reporting in an ACA World - An IC Check-Up...

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FEATURED WHITE PAPER

Is the Answer to Enhanced Patient Safety Hiding in Plain Sight?
The Transformation of “Incident Reporting"

Is the Answer to Enhanced Patient Safety Hiding in Plain Sight? The Transformation of “Incident ReportingWe all have these systems, whether paper or electronic, that are supposed to capture incidents that can lead to and/or have resulted in patient harm. Most of these systems can do this, but many will agree that there is something missing – something important – when it comes to whether or not these systems actually enhance patient safety.

We cannot just track incidents anymore; we need to make this an organization-wide process where we build awareness, which leads to intervention, and results in changes that can be seen and monitored. In this white paper, we discuss the transformation of traditional “incident reporting” into an integrated patient safety management system and offer a path to achieve this transformation.


Click here to download a free PDF.

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Our approach to health is undergoing a transformation, with profound implications for the role of the patient, the practice and business of medicine, and for many of the efforts we’ve come to think of as patient safety projects. The impulses feeding this transformation come largely from the public—consumers, politicians, government agencies, nonprofit organizations—not so much from providers and traditional medical institutions. This transformation is consistent with a broad-based consumerism movement, driven in part by access to information and technology.

 

Our approach to health is undergoing a transformation, with profound implications for the role of the patient, the practice and business of medicine, and for many of the efforts we’ve come to think of as patient safety projects. The impulses feeding this transformation come largely from the public—consumers, politicians, government agencies, nonprofit organizations—not so much from providers and traditional medical institutions. This transformation is consistent with a broad-based consumerism movement, driven in part by access to information and technology.

 

All around, I see signs of this transformation, and I’ve begun writing about it. In my Editor’s Notebook column in the May/June issue of PSQH (my column is available now, with the rest of the issue available shortly by mail and online), I settled on the concept of personal accountability to describe an important element of this transformation as it affects patient safety. Personal accountability amounts to individuals and organizations committing themselves to performing to the best of their abilities, communicating with honesty and respect, and using technology and data effectively and appropriately?all of which are important drivers of patient safety.

Will Smythe, MD, explores this general healthcare transformation in “The Decline and Fall of American Medical Authority,” an essay posted to his blog Will and Reason on May 26. Smythe describes the evolution of healthcare from basic home care in the 19th century, through the development of the science and business of medicine through the 20th century, and recent changes that begin to return responsibility for healthcare back to individuals and patients. Symthe reflects,

When I was a busy surgeon, I would routinely ask post-operative patients on hospital rounds how they were feeling, as I would enter their rooms—some variation of the simple question, “How are you doing today?” Interestingly, one of the more reproducible responses was, “I don’t know… you’re the doctor—tell me.” There are early indications that as a species, our willing and dispassionate dependence on someone else to manage our health and tell us how we are feeling has peaked.

 

Smythe goes on to describe ways in which individuals are assuming more direct responsibility for their health and becoming more engaged in medical decision making. He finds evidence in stories about patients who have challenged physicians to go beyond assumptions to find a correct diagnosis, members of the Quantified Self movement who routinely collect and analyze data about their own health, and companies that are beginning to make genetic information available to consumers. Smythe comments, “Like it or not, the end of total dependence on the traditional delivery system to tell you what is wrong with you and view you as a passive participant [in] the battles that are waged against your own illnesses has long since passed.”

Patient safety is part of this evolution away from authority and paternalism and toward everyone being accountable as active participants in health. Patient safety, with its emphasis on teamwork, respect, and transparency, can provide important leadership for the transformation.

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ABQAURP American Society for Quality American Society for Quality Healthcare Division Consumers Advancing Patient Safety
EMPSF Institute for Safe Medical Practices
           
Medically Induced Trauma Support Services (MITSS) Medication Safety Officers Society NPSF Partnership for Patient Safety Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine